What A Vegan Ultra-Athlete Eats In A Day (Plus how he supplements)

Although the image of veganism is slowly changing, when people think of the word ‘vegan’, many still associate the lifestyle with: extreme, unhealthy, unnatural or even weak.

Vegan ultra-athlete, Rich Roll shatters those impressions. The 51-year-old is supremely fit, a best-selling author and an example that it’s not too late to seek change in your life.

After a decade of alcohol and substance abuse, and then another decade of working himself into the ground as a lawyer,

at 40-years-old, Roll was overweight and facing a life crisis.

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“I was somebody who grew up with a lot of promise in my life. When I graduated high school I had fantastic grades and I was a really great swimmer,” Roll told The Huffington Post Australia.

“I ended up going to Stanford, an amazing academic institution with an amazing swimming program. When I arrived there I proceeded to give away a lot of these opportunities because I became more interested in drugs and alcohol than I did in anything aspirational.”

Roll was able to graduate from college, but he found himself “on this train that was pulling out of the station towards becoming an alcoholic”.

‘I was having vodka tonics in the shower, sneaking drinks throughout the day, just living like a life-long 65-year-old alcoholic.’

What A Vegan Ultra-Athlete Eats In A Day (Plus how he supplements)

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“Throughout my 20s I partied and didn’t get life too seriously, and it worked until it stopped working,” Roll said.

“I started having a lot of chaotic experiences and the quality of my life devolved to the point where, at the end, I was a round-the-clock drinker.’

“I alienated myself from friends and family, I was basically teetering on homelessness and I was on the verge of losing my job as a lawyer.”

Roll had to go to rehab where he was for 100 days. At 31 years of age, Roll got sober.

“I then spent my 30s trying to repair all the damage I had created as a result of all my drinking and using, and so I thrust all of my substance and alcoholic tendencies into work, a unhealthy lifestyle and dietary choices.

“Basically, I was on the track to achieving the American dream, I was going to do what I wanted, I was working 80 hours a week in a law firm, but just eating fast food, not exercising and not taking care of myself whatsoever.”

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And then came the tipping point.

“By the time I was 39, I had achieved all of these goals that I had set for myself. I had become successful, a responsible member of society, I had met my wife, we were starting a family, I had a nice sports car in the driveway — I had a lot of good things in my life,” Roll said.

“But by the time I was 39 I was 50 pounds (22kg) overweight and having an existential crisis about what I was doing with myself. I was so intent on proving to myself and the world that I could fix this problem, but I never stopped to think, ‘Is this really how I want to live? What is it that I want?'”

One night, shortly before I turned 40, I became out of breath from a simple flight of stairs when I was going to bed. I had to pause, I was winded, there was tightening in my chest, sweat on my brow. I feared I was on the precipice of having a heart attack.

“Heart disease runs in my family. It’s a terrifying ailment.

“That was when I knew. It was my second rock bottom.

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That thrust me into this new phase of trying to find a way to eat and live that would be alignment with my higher self and my healthiest self.”

After trying a range of diets over the course of the next year, Roll finally came across a wholefood vegan diet.

“It changed everything. I had so much energy all of a sudden. I actually wanted to take care of myself. I wanted to exercise,” Roll explained.

“About 10 to 14 days into eating a completely wholefood plant-based diet, I realised how different it was to everything else I tried. It revitalised me like no other way of eating. I wanted to feel this way all the time.”

It was then that Roll became more educated about the benefits of a wholefood plant-based diet. He enlisted the help of an old swimming friend, who acted as a mentor to help make the transition so that he could do so responsibly and intelligently with the right tools.

As Roll became fitter, stronger and lost 22kg, becoming an ultra-athlete was almost a natural progression.

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“I wasn’t intent on becoming a competitive athlete in my 40s, but with every consecutive week that went by, I was getting fitter and stronger, and I became amazed at the resilience of the human body,” Roll said.

“That got me interested in testing the outer limits of my own potential and, ultimately, that’s what attracted me to the world of ultra endurance and the races I compete in.”

“There’s nothing that’s not improved or impacted positively and significantly by living this life. My plant-based diet is what propelled me, what made me capable of doing what I did.

“My plant-based diet is not a hindrance, it’s a secret weapon.”

What A Vegan Ultra-Athlete Eats In A Day (Plus how he supplements)

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If you’re wondering, at a training point of view, how a wholefood vegan diet is beneficial to an athlete, it’s all about reducing inflammation.

“Plant-based foods are, in general, far less inflammation provoking. They’re anti-inflammatory,” Rolls said.

“As an athlete, you’re always trying to improve and enhance your recovery. You get stronger and faster and more powerful in the time in between workouts, when your body is trying to repair the tissue damage from exercise-induced stress.

“Eating plant-based reduces inflammatory responses which allows the body to rehabilitate itself more quickly, meaning you can bounce back more quickly, which in terms means you can train harder and you’re less likely to get overtired, over-train or injured.

“When you protract that over the course of a season or a year, you’re going to see tremendous performance gains. I think eating plant-based is optimal for athletes.”

Wondering what Rich Roll eats in a day?

Check out his full daily routine in the original piece published here.

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